How do I interpret eNPS scores?

Employer Net Promoter Score (eNPS) calculation

Team members will answer a question from an 11-point scale ranging from 0 (Very Unlikely) to 10 (Very Likely).

Based on the team members score they will be grouped into 3 categories: Promoters (score 9 - 10), Passives (score 7 - 8) and Detractors (score 0 - 6).


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Using the above groups we can calculate the eNPS:

% of Promoters - % of Detractors = eNPS (scale from -100 to +100)

🤔 Why are passives not included in the calculation? This is because these scores are considered as neutral so do not directly impact the score.

Example 1

Your organisation had 100 responses to the eNPS question

  • 60 (60%) scored between 9 - 10 (Promoters)
  • 30 (30%) scored between 7- 8 (Passives)
  • 10 (10%) scored between 0 - 6 (Detractors)

60% (Promoters) - 10% (Detractors) = +50 (eNPS)

Example 2

Your organisation had 1000 responses to the eNPS question

  • 200 (20%) scored between 9 - 10 (Promoters)
  • 500 (50%) scored between 7- 8 (Passives)
  • 300 (30%) scored between 0 - 6 (Detractors)

20% (Promoters) - 30% (Detractors) = -10 (eNPS)

 

What is a good eNPS Score?

As a general rule an eNPS average of around +30 is good and one nearing or above +50 is outstanding.
However the ideal eNPS score can vary for different organisations and industries. Using your own organisation as the benchmark is the best way to identify if your eNPS score is good.
A good eNPS score for your organisation is one that has trended up when asked on a regular basis. If your previous score was -10 and has now increased to +20, this is a good sign that your business is moving in the right direction. The opposite is also true, if the scores are decreasing this would be a clue for possible improvements that are required.